Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia Review (PC) – The reason these isles are called ‘Great’

thrones of britannia review pc - feature

Over the years, there have been many Total War games but few have managed to sink their hooks into me for long. They often suffer from similar issues as Civilization and other 4X games; once you reach a certain strength the tension and struggle fades away. It’s a problem faced by games with large, sweeping maps and the reason why the more focused Total War: Shogun 2 is one of the most decorated games in the franchise. On the surface Thrones of Britannia tries to replicate that scale by setting itself on a very different but equally wartorn cluster of islands – Britain.

Thrones of Britannia Review PC - army
They look so happy bless then.

Should you buy it?

It’s time to acknowledge that this review is late. This means I’ve played a lot of Thrones of Britannia and soaked up other reviews and people’s general opinion. That being said, this is a completely separate review that has the benefit of being able to comment on other peoples’ thoughts since launch. 

For those who haven’t played a Total War game (what’ve you been doing?), gameplay takes place on two levels. The first is an overview map that shows all the regions across Britain. Here you can recruit units, construct buildings, move armies, conduct diplomacy and a whole host of other things. The second level is an RTS where you directly control your troops in battles. The two compliment each other wonderfully, as they have in all previous games. If any of that sounds compelling, then Thrones of Britannia is a great place to return, join or continue with this fantastic series. It isn’t perfect, but it is the best historical strategy game released in years.

thrones of britannia review pc - battle
The RTS layer is as dramatic and satisfying as ever.

The Game

So far so Total War. Most of the changes made to Thrones of Britannia are found on the map level. As well as managing which buildings to build and making sure you have enough axemen to make a forest run in fear, you also need to manage the loyalty of your nobels and conduct internal diplomacy. In a leaf taken from Crusader Kings, you can complete various intrigue missions including shaming and assassinating any nobel that presents a threat to your kingdom. Conversely, you can also adopt your favourite generals or find them a wife. While features similar to this are present in previous titles, this is the first time they have felt fleshed out to this extent giving you more reason to pay attention between battles.

At the end of the day, Total War games are about conquest. This means that adding some flavour that isn’t about battles and armies makes the historical characters come to life. There has always been an inkling of this in previous games, but this is the first time you will consider these elements as anything more than stat buffs and it helps to draw the world together. Instead of getting your prized general a wife because it provides a handy stat boost to his zeal, you also want to make sure the man who fought so hard for his King leads a happy life.

Thrones of Britannia Review PC - marriage
Not happy with this wifely candidate? You can always shop around for another. Grimly, those stats matter.

Thrones of Britannia, more than any other Total War game before, wants you to experience a narrative. Calling it a story is much too generous, but Creative Assembly made the progress of your nation feel like more than merely spreading your colour across the map. The reduced scale and attempt give character to historical figures goes a long way in making this effort a success.

This same effect is also present in how players unlock new units and research tiers. Unlike previous games, units are now tied to research and that same research is far harder to acquire. Recruiting elite units is now a challenge because you must fulfil campaign requirements to unlock their research tier. This might be winning fights, capturing territory or using a certain unit.

Mustering a unit also requires more thought as they do not form at full capacity. Gone are the days of spamming recruit and seeing your army go from nonexistent to legendary overnight. In Thrones of Britannia, you’re forced to think whether recruiting is useful if it takes 5 turns for them to be at their best. This makes the game feel more realistic, like you’re commanding real people in a real place.

Thrones of Britannia Review PC - research
This new research system turns each technology into an achievement for your kingdom.

All of this builds into one of the major themes of this game – war weariness. It is bizarre that a game so focused on war and giving your enemies a good thrashing includes something like war weariness. If you spend too much time fighting, your subjects start getting weary, leading to a revolt. Taking a moment to consider whether, as a King, you should start a conflict is something completely unexpected.

Each addition and change, mixes up the Total War formula to create something that feels fresh and exciting. The step from Rome 2 to Attila felt minimal and the Warhammer games are something else entirely. This feels like the next logical progression for historical Total War games. Rather than being a game with a singular tone, you are given choices that impact your kingdom.

Throughout my research for this review, one of the major criticisms aimed at this game is that it simplifies the Total War experience. And, for the most part, this is true. Many elements like construction and army management are streamlined. However, these rounded edges are not necessarily a bad thing. Those who want a complex Total War game have the likes of Rome 2 or the Warhammer games. However, for a newcomer to the franchise or genre, there is now one obvious choice – Thrones of Britannia.

This streamlining does not make Thrones of Britannia a simple game. Instead, it increases the likelihood that Total War newbies will have an enjoyable experience. There is still plenty of complexity and strategy to be found here. Battles are just as intense and clever tactics will win the day. The same is true for making shrewd use of the intrigue and overworld map options. The softening of the experience means that veterans and newcomers alike can enjoy it.

Thrones of Britannia Review PC - farm
Really, this is a game about simple peasants trying to live their lives while those in power squabble and send them to their deaths.

Now, I could describe the mechanical elements and what they are like. However, I hope me saying that they are the same quality we have come to expect from Total War suffices. You will have some problems, but nothing game breaking. Instead, we desperately need to discuss the greatest asset of this, and any Total War game – the setting.

Being British, perhaps I’m overly fond of playing a game set in my home country. However, the detail put into making the map feel British is astounding. Little things like including the world famous Stonehenge to lesser-known landmarks such as White Horse and geographically accurate mountains such as Snowdon in Wales. These additions make the map come to life in a way that was missing in previous titles.

Like Shogun 2 before it, you learn the best way to move around this limited space. The scale might be smaller, but that isn’t to say it feels less impressive. Moving an army through Britain feels epic, giving a real sense for how far your men have marched each turn. It goes from being a nebulous distance to moving from Oxford to Cardiff. The names might be different, but the distance and geography are the same.

Thrones of Britannia Review PC - ireland
Diplomacy is back and it still doesn’t really work.

Thrones of Britannia is easily the most accessible game in the series, but at the same time manages to feel like the freshest entry on the historical side. Instead of retreading old ground, it experiments and tries something different while including all the trappings of modern Total War games with features like multiplayer, lots of diverse factions and lengthy campaigns. It would have been nice to see historical battles make a return, but perhaps they will come in the future. If you haven’t played a Total War game for a while or want to scratch that historical itch, then you could do a lot worse than Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia.

Over the years, there have been many Total War games but few have managed to sink their hooks into me for long. They often suffer from similar issues as Civilization and other 4X games; once you reach a certain strength the tension and struggle fades away. It's a problem faced by games with large, sweeping maps and the reason why the more focused Total War: Shogun 2 is one of the most decorated games in the franchise. On the surface Thrones of Britannia tries to replicate that scale by setting itself on a very different but equally wartorn cluster of islands…
This is the best historical Total War game in a long time. The reduced geographical scale makes each battle meaningful. Decisions feel like they impact people rather than numbers for the first time in the series. Thrones of Britannia adds enough new, interesting elements to excite existing fans and is simple enough an entry to entice new ones at the same time.

Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia

Score - 80%

80%

Historically great

This is the best historical Total War game in a long time. The reduced geographical scale makes each battle meaningful. Decisions feel like they impact people rather than numbers for the first time in the series. Thrones of Britannia adds enough new, interesting elements to excite existing fans and is simple enough an entry to entice new ones at the same time.

User Rating: Be the first one !

  • Posts
Nevada Dru Author
Nevada (or Nevi) is a UK-based freelance writer. When he’s not feeling daunted by the size and scale of his backlog of work and games, he spends his time buried in a good book or playing a board game. Nevada is also one of the co-owners of Bits & Pieces, a non-traditional games website where he hosts a podcast and has a range of, hopefully, interesting articles.
follow me
  • RT @nicthehumanboy: I went and reviewed Valkyria Chronicles 4 for @VG247 https://t.co/vavf4iCElV
    3 hours ago
  • RT @StrangeAnimaIs: The male lance-nosed chameleon or blade chameleon can be found in eastern Madagascar. (Photo: Nick Garbutt) https://t.…
    5 hours ago
  • petition to for Hitman 2 to give agent 47 the catchphrase ‘it’s-a-me, Hitmanio’ which he exclaims jovially every ti… https://t.co/8FxR81K6sq
    6 hours ago
  • whatever necromancer is currently animated theresa may’s corpse has really lost the plot
    7 hours ago
  • RT @VG247: Valkyria Chronicles 4 review – war never changes https://t.co/l0idjlLcjE https://t.co/o3p7SJCJjY
    9 hours ago
Sep 14, 2018
Stop hitting yourself.
Sep 12, 2018
Ghost Squad, Ghost Squad, Ghost Squad, Ghost Squad, Ghost Squad, Ghost Squad.
Sep 10, 2018
Decision-siders.
Sep 7, 2018
Grab your hat and scarf, this one has a cold open.
Sep 2, 2018
Our first proper video.
×
Nevada Dru Author
Nevada (or Nevi) is a UK-based freelance writer. When he’s not feeling daunted by the size and scale of his backlog of work and games, he spends his time buried in a good book or playing a board game. Nevada is also one of the co-owners of Bits & Pieces, a non-traditional games website where he hosts a podcast and has a range of, hopefully, interesting articles.
Latest Posts
  • thrones of britannia review pc - feature

What did you think?

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

You may like

In the news
Load More